Community

Police to replace fleet with new-look vehicles

Beginning this summer, York Regional Police (YRP) officers will be hitting the road in new cruisers and other fleet vehicles that include new striping that promises to increase visibility.

“We’re pleased to offer our frontline officers a more comfortable, safer vehicle that also increases their visibility in the community,” Chief Jim MacSween says. “The new design is modern, appealing and easily recognizable to citizens and will assist in our crime prevention and patrol efforts.”

The two-tone base design is a simpler, yet bolder blue-on-white and white-on-blue combination than the current design, which is 10 years old. Though it has a nostalgic feel, it maintains a distinctive look that’s common throughout police agencies within Ontario, YRP reports.

The new vehicles focus on ergonomics and comfort for frontline officers, whose vehicles can serve as their office for 12 hours a day. New features include in-car equipment placement for ease of access, a redesigned equipment enclosure for the trunk to maximize equipment capacity, and additional side and forward lighting to enhance intersection visibility and clearing ability.

A modular design and construction will reduce downtime related to repairing, building, commissioning and decommissioning the vehicles. The vehicles feature a more rugged and louder siren. Electronically operated spotlights are tied into the emergency lighting system; lights and sirens are integrated into the vehicle on-board computer; and vehicle-to-vehicle syncing of emergency lights offers more control and ease when working on scene.

The new design was selected from more than 40 choices with input from members of the District Community Liaison Committee, Police Community Advisory Committee and the Investigative Services Community Advisory Committee.

Vehicles will be replaced on their regular replacement schedule once they reach their end-of-service life. It will take a few years to replace the entire YRP fleet.

Photo: “We’re pleased to offer our frontline officers a more comfortable, safer vehicle that also increases their visibility in the community,” Chief Jim MacSween says. 

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